Question of fact defeated defendant metal-concert venue’s motion for summary judgment on the ground of primary assumption of risk regarding plaintiff’s injury from moshing. 

Plaintiff was a first-time attendee at a general-admission “metal” (a/k/a heavy metal) concert at defendant’s concert hall.  Plaintiff alleged he was pushed from behind in the mosh pit and was hit in the eye as he was attempting to exit the mosh pit.

Per Wikipedia, moshing or slamdancing is a style of dance in which participants push or slam into each other typically performed to “aggressive” live music. Moshing usually happens in an area called the “pit” (sometimes called a “mosh pit”) near the stage. It is intended to be energetic and full of body contact.

Defendant’s general manager testified at his deposition that there were two state-licensed security guards on duty that evening; the show was almost sold out; and moshing would be stopped if and when it became unsafe and affected bystanders.

Defendant moved for summary judgment vis-à-vis plaintiff’s negligence causes of action, on the grounds that (a) plaintiff had assumed the risk (primary assumption of risk) or alternatively (b) that an unforeseen and sudden criminal act of an uncontrollable third party caused the incident and defendant had taken adequate security measures.

The Second Department declined to grant defendant summary judgment on the first ground (the doctrine of primary assumption of risk), finding questions of fact.  Primary assumption of risk is a complete defense and applies when a consenting participant in a qualified activity is aware of the risks, has an appreciation of the nature of the risks, and voluntarily assumes the risks.  A person who chooses to engage in such an activity consents to those commonly appreciated risks which are inherent in and arise out of the nature of the activity generally and flow from such participation,  The duty owed in these situations is a duty to exercise care to make the conditions as safe as they appear to be.  The doctrine has generally been restricted to particular athletic and recreative activities in recognition that such pursuits have enormous social value even while they may involve significantly heightened risks and are, therefore, worthy of insulation from a breach of duty claim.

[NB: Under secondary assumption of risk, assumption of the risk is merged into the comparative fault scheme, and the trier of fact, in apportioning the loss resulting from the injury, may consider the relative responsibilities of the parties.  NY PJI 2:55.]

Without reaching the question of whether attending a metal music concert where “moshing” takes place is a qualified activity under the doctrine of primary assumption of risk, the Second Department held that defendant failed to eliminate triable issues of fact as to whether it met its duty to exercise care to make the conditions at the subject venue as safe as they appeared to be and whether it unreasonably increased the usual risks inherent in the activity of concert going.  Defendant also failed to eliminate triable issues of fact as to whether the plaintiff assumed the risk of injury, whether the plaintiff’s alleged injuries were foreseeable, and whether defendant provided adequate security measures and, if not, whether its failure was a proximate cause of the plaintiff’s alleged injuries.   Nevo v Knitting Factory Brooklyn, Inc., 2017 NY Slip Op 03186, 2nd Dept 4-26-17

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